Prior to credentialing, candidates must successfully complete the following training programs:

  1. ICC-approved Plans Examiner (2 hours)
  2. Software analyst specific ANSI/RESNET/ICC 301-2019 training by Building Science Education( 12 hours) 
  3. ANSI/RESNET/ACCA 310-2020 training by Building Science Education (4 hours)
  4. Energy Modeler training by Building Science Education (7 hours)
  5. ENERGY STAR Single Family training by Building Science Education (3.2 hours)
  6. ENERGY STAR MultiFamily training by Building Science Education (4.8 hours)
  7. HouseRater training by Building Science Education (2hours)

ENERGY STAR Software Analyst Required Assessments

  1. ICC-proctored Plans Examiner exam
  2. ENERGY STAR Single Family exam proctored by Building Science Education
  3. ENERGY STAR MultiFamily exam proctored by Building Science Education
  4. 10 energy models in HouseRater (plans & specs provided by Building Science Education), evaluated by Quality Assessor or Quality Assessment Designee credentialed by the Building Science Institute 
    1. 2 single story
    2. 2 2-story
    3. 2 duplexes
    4. 2 townhouses
    5. 2 apartment units
  • Type C: A verification organization that provides first party verifications, second party verifications, or both, which forms an identifiable but not necessarily a separate part of an organization involved in the design, manufacture, supply, installation, use or maintenance of the items it inspects and which supplies verification services to the parent organization, other parties, or both, must meet the following requirements:
    • The verification organization must provide safeguards within the organization to ensure adequate segregation of responsibilities and accountabilities between verifications and other activities.
    • The design, manufacture, supply, installation, servicing, or maintenance and the verification of the same item carried out by a Type C organization must not be performed by the same person.
      • Verifications performed by Type C verification organizations are not considered third party verifications.
    • Example: An inspection division or company owned by a homebuilder that performs verifications on the homes built by the homebuilder and others is a Type C verification organization.
  • Type B: A verification organization that provides first party verifications, second party verifications, or both, which forms a separate and identifiable part of an organization involved in the design, manufacture, supply, installation, use or maintenance of the items it inspects and which supplies verification services only to its parent organization (in-house verification body) must meet the following requirements:
    • The verification organization must only supply verification services to the organization of which the verification organization forms a part.
    • A clear separation of the responsibilities of the verification personnel from those of the personnel employed in the other functions must be established by organizational identification and the reporting methods of the verification organization within the parent organization.
    • The verification organization and its personnel must not engage in any activities that may conflict with their independence of judgment and integrity in relation to their verification activities. They must not engage in the design, manufacture, supply, installation, use or maintenance of the items verified.
      • Verifications performed by Type C verification organizations are not considered third party verifications.
    • Example: An inspection division of an HVAC contractor that only verifies the projects where the HVAC contractor performed the installation is a Type B verification organization.

What qualifies as a Type “A” Verification Organization?

Building Science Institute, Ltd. Co., has three separate categories of

  • Type A: A verification organization that provides third party verifications must meet the following requirements:
    • The verification organization must be independent of the parties involved in the construction of the home.
    • The verification organization and it personnel must not engage in any activities that may conflict with their independence of judgment and integrity in relation to their verification activities. They must not be engaged in the design, manufacture, supply, installation, purchase, ownership, use or maintenance of the items verified.
    • The verification organization must not be part of a legal entity that is engaged in design, manufacture, supply, installation, purchase, ownership, use or maintenance of the items verified.
    • The verification organization must not be linked to a separate legal entity engaged in the design, manufacture, supply, installation, purchase, ownership, use or maintenance of the items verified, by the following:
      • Common ownership except where the owners have no ability to influence the outcome of an verification
      • Common ownership appointees on the boards or equivalent of the organizations, except where these functions have no influence on the verification outcomes
      • Direct reporting to the same higher level of management except where this cannot influence the verification outcomes
      • Contractual commitments (or other means) that may have an ability to influence verification outcomes
    • Example: An inspection company that only performs inspections on dwelling units and has independent ownership is a Type A verification organization.

What's my certification?

Are you already certified under RESNET, BPI, or other organizations? Find out what your equivalent certification is here!

Recognition of Other Certifications or Credentials

Current RESNET certifications are considered by Building Science Education to determine required training and assessments needed to become credentialed by the Building Science Institute.

Qualifications such as an ICC certification as a Residential Building Inspector or Plans Examiner/Energy Code Inspector, or registered/licensed engineer or architect are considered by Building Science Education to determine required training and assessments needed to become credentialed by the Building Science Institute.

Recognition is considered on a case-by-case basis.